Doing the Math A Newcomer’s Guide to Selecting a Math Curriculum

One of the hardest parts for parents starting out homeschooling, and even to veteran homeschoolers, is selecting the right math curriculum. It’s not a secret that teaching math is one of the big concerns for people contemplating homeschooling. Actually, in case you research homeschool terms on the internet, you will discover that “homeschool math curriculum” will show up as one of the most frequently used search terms on the web! Obviously there is a demand for folks seeking the correct math curriculum. So, what are the issues you have to contemplate when evaluating the many different math curriculum available?

One of the hardest parts for parents starting out homeschooling, and even to veteran homeschoolers, is selecting the right math curriculum. It’s not a secret that teaching math is one of the big concerns for people contemplating homeschooling. Actually, in case you research homeschool terms on the internet, you will discover that “homeschool math curriculum” will show up as one of the most frequently used search terms on the web! Obviously there’s a demand for folks seeking the correct math curriculum. So, what are the issues you have to contemplate when evaluating the many different math curriculum available?

The Student’s Learning Style

Knowing your child’s learning style really means understanding your child. Now this probably appears pretty simplistic since usually we’re homeschooling our very own kids. But what this means is having a genuine grasp of what your student’s learning style is. You will find numerous distinct math curriculum on the market that employ different educational philosophies. So being familiar with your child’s inherent learning style is essential in determining the best math curriculum for them. What exactly are the basic learning styles? Well, if you investigate, you will find three. They are Visual Learners, Auditory Learners and Kinesthetic (or Tactile) Learners.

Those who are visual learners understand through seeing. Pictures, diagrams, drawings on a chalkboard, etc. will likely be far more efficient when teaching visual learners.

Auditory learners learn by way of listening. People who learn through hearing find learning environments most successful when they include lecture, conversation, listening and the chance to converse as they absorb information.

Is your child often fiddling with something when you’re teaching them? Odds are they are a Kinesthetic or Tactile learner. This learning style finds a learning environment most successful when the environment allows for hand’s on activity and exploring the physical world. Kinesthetic learners find it very hard if they can’t do something active for a lengthy time and have to have activity incorporated into their lessons.

So what does that have to do with a math curriculum? Well you will find a number of curriculum accessible to suit every learning style. Begin by evaluating what math curriculum provides the elements that meet the needs of your student?